Top 10 Videos tips

Work On Your Camera Presence.

If you appear in your professional videos, the way you carry yourself on camera has an enormous impact on how professional your content looks. Appearing nervous, fidgety, or uncomfortable on camera will distract viewers from your message. Fortunately, this is something you can improve with practice. If you weren’t born with great camera presence, here are a few of the main things to focus on when you film yourself.

  • Use calm, open body language. Stand up straight – poor posture is immediately obvious on camera. Keep your shoulders back and your muscles relaxed. Take deep breaths. Don’t cross your arms, since this makes you look closed-off.
  • Smile, especially at the beginning of your video. It makes a huge difference in how friendly you seem.
  • Slow down slightly when you talk, and make an effort to enunciate clearly. Speak from your diaphragm rather than your throat.
  • If you feel jittery, try using props to keep your hands occupied. Writing on a whiteboard, for instance, can give you something to focus on besides the camera.
  • Practice, practice, practice. Watch footage of yourself and identify the areas where you could improve. Then make a conscious effort to work on those things.

Shoot from a Variety of Angles.

Cutting from one angle to another is a good (and simple) way to add visual interest to your professional videos. This is an especially useful technique if you’re making a how-to video, a product demo, or another type of video that shows you doing something rather than just talking. Shoot plenty of B-roll footage for each video so you have the option of using it later if you want to. Pro tip: when you change perspectives, shift by at least 45 degrees. Smaller shifts in perspective don’t really create the intended effect – they just look jarring to the viewer.

Plan Your Videos in Advance.

Poor technique isn’t the only thing that can make a video look unprofessional. A lack of planning can also leave viewers underwhelmed with your finished product. By taking the time to plan your video thoroughly before you start production, you can ensure that the quality of your actual content is just as good as the quality of your footage. Every time you make a video, start by defining its purpose. Ask yourself what you want to achieve or communicate by making this video. In addition, define your target audience. How will you make your video speak to these viewers in particular? Once you’ve defined your video’s goals, write a script and create a storyboard. Then revise them until they’re as good as you can make them. Don’t be afraid to rearrange, rewrite, and delete sections that don’t work. Rambling videos bore viewers, so keep your videos as brief and tight as possible.

Try not to mix your video lighting

When DIYing your video lighting setup, you might have the urge to combine all the light sources laying around your house. Fight that instinct. Using competing color temperatures (think: warm light from a lamp combined with cool sunlight) can make shots look different as your camera tries to adjust to the new white balances. Daylight color bulbs (5,000-6,000K) are available at most stores but when in doubt, stick with natural lighting.

Promote Your Videos.

Creating your videos is only half the battle. The other half is getting people to watch them. If you want to present yourself as a serious and professional video creator, you’ve got to promote your videos and grow your following. It’s okay not to have a lot of views or audience interaction when you start out. Everybody has to start somewhere, and some channels naturally have more mass appeal than others, which gives them an advantage in picking up new viewers. But as you create and publish more videos, your viewership should grow over time. Having lots of videos, but almost no views, can make your channel seem amateurish to the viewers who do come along. So how can you promote your videos effectively as a beginner? Here are a few strategies to start with.

  • Put your videos in the appropriate formats for social media. If you’re using Wave.video, you can easily resize your video for any major social media platform.
  • Upload your videos to the channels your target audience uses. Don’t waste too much energy promoting your videos on platforms that aren’t popular with your audience.
  • Learn the basics of video SEO. Writing good descriptions, using keywords, and tagging your videos correctly can help you get more views.
  • Publish new videos regularly. Fresh content tells viewers that your channel is active and growing. This makes them more likely to come back.
  • Interact with your audience as much as possible. Respond to comments, answer questions, and thank viewers for taking the time to watch your videos.

Find content based on meta tags

meta: lets you filter content based on special tags in HTML. Example, meta:Search.os(“Windows 10”) This will show all pages that include windows 10 in the meta tag.

Bing Education Carousel

This Bing tip is for students and parents who would like to make learning easier. Just type “Education on Bing” to find notes on popular topics related to math, science, language, etc., for better concept building. Learners can search for specific topics too such as “Solar System” or “Periodic Table.”

Create a Storyboard and/or Shooting Script

The best marketing videos don’t just happen – they’re a result of meticulous planning and preparation. Before you even think about getting your camera equipment ready, consider putting a storyboard and shooting script together. Storyboarding helps you figure out exactly what shots you need before you start filming, and a shooting script is like a screenplay for your video. Storyboard panels for ‘Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Part 2’ You don’t have to draw a stunning masterpiece for your storyboard. In fact, you don’t need to draw it at all. You can use a series of still photographs as a storyboard, or even rough sketches or stick figures – whatever is easiest. Just make sure you know what shots you need before you start filming. Remember – the more time you spend planning your marketing video, the less likely you are to find yourself missing footage later on.

Code Sample Answer & Code Compiler

Bing search engine can answer your programming query right away. Just type your programming query, and the search engine’s advanced algorithm will extract the code snippet (if it is available) from any indexed article, online documentation or forum discussion. The answer or code snippets will be displayed in the search result itself with a link to the source article. The best part isn’t over yet — you can also use the Bing Search as a code compiler. Let’s say you want to learn about arrays in C++ language. Just type C++ array in the search box, and you will see a code compiler right in the search results with a code for arrays in C++ language. You can modify the code, change values and compile it right there on the search page!

Use a Script  – Don't Ramble

Too many people tend to want to skip to the fun part – the shooting, and not work with a script, storyboard, shot sheet or any type of plan to getting their training video done. This wastes a lot of time and doesn't inform the audience well, and key points can be missed or lost in translation.

  • Follow the same format for every video you make, especially if they're in a common series.
  • Make a script – even if it's just a bullet point list of steps to illustrate.
  • Read through the script out loud – understanding the spoken word is different than reading a written word. Some sounds don't go together well when spoken, like the "ka" sound of a word that ends with a "K" followed by that same sound from a word that begins with a "K" or "Q"  as in  "Rake Quick."
  • Have a second list in your script of all the props or tools you'll need and line them up on a table outside of the shooting area in the order you'll need them.
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