Top 10 Learn japanese tips

Don’t be afraid to make mistakes

When you start to practice Japanese, you are always going to make mistakes. But if you don’t put a foot wrong, you won’t grow! Making mistakes and receiving feedback from others is the most effective way to learn a language. However, keep in mind that native Japanese speakers may not want to correct you out of respect, so make it clear that you’d appreciate some guidance.

Practice grammar

How do you learn Japanese grammar? If you want to master it perfectly, you have to forget everything you know about English grammar as they differ dramatically. Unlike many of the romance languages, Japanese has only two tenses: past and non-past (present and future). However, there are two forms: polite and plain. The last one is used for casual speech. We recommend that you start to learn Japanese grammar with the help of textbooks. The best books to learn Japanese grammar are:

  • Practice Makes Perfect: Basic Japanese;
  • A Guide to Japanese Grammar by Tae Kim;
  • Japanese Hiragana & Katakana for Beginners. It’s also important to mention that Japanese has an entirely different writing system: from right to left, from top to bottom. In these textbooks, you’ll find a lot of practical lessons that will help you get a sense of Japanese writing.

Make your interfaces easy to learn

When it comes to simplicity, people often cite a paper by Harvard psychologist George Miller called, “The Magical Number Seven, Plus or Minus Two: Some Limits on our Capacity for Processing Information.” The article suggests that people can only hold 5 to 9 things in their short term memory with any reliability. Miller himself called this a coincidence, but that doesn’t seem to hold anyone back from citing him. That said, it’s only logical that the simpler something is, the easier it is to remember in the short term. So, whenever possible, limit the number of things a person needs to remember to use your interface efficiently and effectively. You can facilitate this by chunking information, i.e., breaking it into small, digestible chunks. This idea dovetails with Tesler’s Law of Conservation of Complexity, which states that UI designers should make their interfaces as simple as possible. That can mean masking the complexity of an application behind a simplified interface whenever possible. A popular example of a product failing to follow this law is Microsoft Word. Most people only do a few things in Word—e.g., typing—while others can use it to do all sorts of powerful things. But around the world, everybody opens the same version of Word, with the same UI, leaving your average Joe—who's not a power user—overwhelmed by the variety of options they’ll probably never use. This led to a concept called progressive disclosure, where advanced features are tucked away on secondary interfaces. You’ll often see this on websites’ home pages, where short chunks of copy introduce a product or feature, then link off to a page where users can learn more. (This also happens to be a best practice for mobile design, where robust navigation is always a challenge.) Pro tip: Avoid using “learn more” and similarly non-specific text in links and buttons. Why? Because it doesn’t tell users what they’ll “learn more” about. Often, people simply scan a page looking for a link that takes them where they want to go, and “learn more,” repeated 15 times, doesn’t help. This is especially true for users of screen readers.

Don’t Blow Your Nose

“Don’t use tissues to blow your nose in public, it’s highly offensive to the Japanese, just sniff.“Sally, 3 Kids v the world

Learn some key phrases

How to learn Japanese fast? Start with the list of the most common words and expressions. Knowing basic phrases like “Hello”, “How do you do?”, and “Nice to meet you” allows you to begin speaking Japanese and quickly join conversations with native speakers. Take a look at the 100+ most important Japanese words — this will be extremely helpful if you ever decide to visit Japan, or if you need a starting point if you decide to relocate there.

Dark Chocolate

Other than the sweet taste, dark chocolate also boosts your brain. It contains three compounds that make this possible, which are, caffeine, antioxidants and flavonoids. Since we have already seen that caffeine offers the stimulating effects that keep you alert and antioxidants help with keeping mental illnesses and cognitive decline at bay, let’s take a closer look at flavonoids. Flavonoids are micronutrients that reduce neuroinflammation, protect neurons from neurotoxin-based injury and are potentially effective in enhancing learning, cognitive performance and memory.[35][36] [37] Studies have also revealed that dark chocolate brings about a positive feeling.[38] Dark chocolate contains cacao, which is often referred to as cocoa. Aiming to eat dark chocolate that carries more than 70% cocoa ensures that you get optimal benefits from it.

Nuts

Nuts such as walnuts, cashew nuts, hazelnuts, pecans, to name a few, contain several brain improving nutrients. They come with the popular antioxidant, Vitamin E, that protects the brain cells and cell membranes from oxidative stress and damage by free radicals.[39][40][41] Long term consumption of nuts has contributed to a sharper memory, better academic performance and lower risks of getting mental illnesses too.[42][43] They have also shown abilities to improve the factors that account for good heart and brain health. All nuts have their nutritional benefits but you are encouraged to eat walnuts more as they have a much higher value due to the presence of high levels of alpha-linolenic acid, which is a type of omega 3 fatty acid.

Use A Good Online Japanese Dictionary

But which one? “Weblio is the best dictionary I've ever seen, with English-Japanese and Japanese-English translations,” says Jorge Manoel.

Use Memrise To Learn To Read The Kanawriting System

“I dove straight into learning Kana [and] I found the system on Memrise to present it very well,” explains Benny Lewis.

Don’t Smoke on the Streets

“If you are a smoker and visiting Japan, be aware that in most big cities you will not be allowed to smoke in the street (and could risk a pretty heavy fine if you do). Instead, you will have to smoke in designated areas, which can be pretty hard to find. It is worth checking online where those laws apply – Tokyo and Kyoto are two of the cities that have applied this ban.”Maria-Carmen, Orient Excess UPDATE: Smoking areas can be found outside every train station and you can still smoke in a lot of restaurants in Japan.